K&L Gates ranked “Recommended” with Claude-Etienne Armingaud in e-health and connected heath.

Source: Leaders League

Practice head(s): Claude-Etienne Armingaud

Testimonials

Skilled technical lawyers with excellent industry knowledge.

Claude-Étienne Armingaud possesses excellent technical legal skills with a sensible practical commercial approach which comes through unrivalled knowledge of the sector.

Claude-Étienne Armingaud is the best at what he does, plain and simply.

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Source: Legal 500

K&L Gates ranked “Highly Recommended – Band 1” with Claude-Etienne Armingaud.

Source: Leaders League

K&L Gates ranked “Recommended” with Claude-Etienne Armingaud.

Source: Leaders League

K&L Gates ranked “Highly Recommended” with Claude-Etienne Armingaud.

Source: Leaders League

K&L Gates ranked “Highly Recommended – Band 1” with Claude-Etienne Armingaud.

Source: Leaders League

We are currently experiencing an interesting time in our economy around the future of work. In describing the future of work, there are four main aspects that come into play: (i) People will be able to work remotely and with flexible schedules; (ii) New industries and jobs will be created complementary to technology; (iii) There will be more entrepreneurship and self-employment; and (iv) Due to technology advancements, there will be fewer jobs that require humans.

Against this backdrop, the COVID-19 outbreak pointed out that these new working norms are going to become the future. In fact, more and more companies wonder whether people can work effectively and achieve a level of work-life balance in light of these new working conditions. At the same time, there is considerable research showing that diversity can be the answer to these considerations, leading to a significant performance advantage.

As law firms around the world have been forced into an unplanned experiment with remote and flexible working, the webinar will aim to explore what the new COVID-19 reality means for the workforce and how can they embrace the pandemic’s opportunities for learning and thriving in the workplace.

On 4 July 2019, the French Data Protection (CNIL) published its Guidelines on Cookies and Other Tracking Technologies (the Guidelines, available in French here). The Guidelines further detailed the nature of the interplay between the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which reinforced expectations towards obtaining consent to data processing operations when such consent is required), and the ePrivacy Directive which more specifically addresses the privacy requirements on cookies and other tracking technologies. Indeed, while the ePrivacy Directive was expected to be updated through an ePrivacy Regulation (latest draft proposal available here), on or before GDPR entered into force, it remains under discussion at the European level to this day, and subject to intense lobbying by all stakeholders.

Further to the publication of the Guidelines, several French professional associations in the online marketing, distance selling and online media activities initiated legal action against the CNIL, before the French Administrative Supreme Court (the Conseil d’État), on the grounds that the CNIL acted above and beyond its authority in adopting the Guidelines, notably by (i) generally prohibiting “cookie walls”, (ii) recognizing a right of data subjects to refuse cookies, (iii) requiring the identification of the data controller for the cookies, (iv) mandating an exhaustive and up-to-date information of the data subjects on the cookies, regardless of their involvement in data processing operations, (v) requiring that the users’ agreement must be expressed by a separate action for each of the distinct purposes brought to their knowledge with a view to the storage of information or access to information already stored in their terminal equipment, and (vi) imposing maximum data retention periods for cookies.

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France’s top administrative court has overruled the country’s data authority regarding “cookie walls”, stating that as an agency that only offers guidelines – so-called flexible laws – the authority cannot prohibit their use.

Cookie walls prevent internet users from accessing websites unless they consent to the use of tracking cookies, which often gather data used by advertisers.

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